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Best Way To Get Ivermectin - Buy Online! You think (as a rationally minded person) it would be obvious, but considering the spate of science deniers we've seen recently, it does make you think. For the record, I have a friend I've known since childhood who converted to a Christian fundamentalist what I can only describe as a "sect" and with her, what the pastor says goes. She threw all sense, logic and education straight out of the window and now believes such bullshit as the earth is flat and only 10K years old. So yeah, maybe we did need a study to give us hope that not every person who believes is like that.

Categories: Ivermectin

Comments

  • Gravity13

    Gravity13

    March 10, 2015, 6:35 pm

    “The Einstein effect provides global evidence for scientific source credibility effects and the influence of religiosity” by Suzanne Hoogeveen et al. Nature Human Behavior

    Reply

  • Tlide

    Tlide

    March 11, 2015, 8:33 am

    I am my own religious leader. I talk to God on a regular, but God doesn't say shit to me. Listen to the scientists, but take everything they say with a sprinkle of salt. Sometimes they get things horribly wrong and it take time to work it out. Science needs time; sometimes months, sometimes decades.

    Reply

  • chromacolor

    chromacolor

    March 10, 2015, 7:19 pm

    And never take any professional at his/her word on things outside their area of expertise. Always seek independent verification. Altogether too many people think some billionaire knows everything about everything just because he inherited money, or confirms their biases.

    Reply

  • UnificationDotCom

    UnificationDotCom

    March 11, 2015, 3:51 am

    At first thought I am happy that people would take info from scientists over religious leaders, but I also don't want people to just blindly follow what the latest study was because (I would we all know) those studies can be manipulated quiet easily to provide info beneficial to the group who funded the study.

    Reply

  • EmpiresCrumble

    EmpiresCrumble

    March 10, 2015, 6:47 pm

    What? I am from India and this is no way true. People in India usually put much MUCH greater faith in gurus and religious clerics than scientists. Scientists are usually considered evil brainwashed people from 'the West' and that stuff like medicines are just corporate ways to get money. Many poor people in here mock rich people for getting a surgery or anything like that saying they are falling for western ploy.

    Seems like by default everybody dosen’t trust scientists lol, slothful induction is everywhere. I must see the the appeal to possibility logic fallacy on a daily basis where people keep trying to bring up the fact that “It’s possible vaccines don’t work” not realizing all inductive reasoning is based on probability. Yes it’s 0.000000000001% your right congratulations.

    Reply

  • Gedrah

    Gedrah

    March 11, 2015, 12:00 am

    Subject matter with intent to educate should never begin and end with a conclusion only. A simple statement of conclusion lacks credibility. It is necessary to include who conducted the study and how they conducted it, what data did the study yield which supports the conclusion and most importantly and especially in comparison findings, is a final summation explaining why the one comparison was found to be more predominant over the other.

    Reply

  • marblelion

    marblelion

    March 10, 2015, 11:07 am

    We analyzed data from the 2018 Sex in Canada survey (n = 1,015 cisgender men) to examine the association between feminist identification and reported use of prescription ED medication (EDM) during men’s last sexual encounter. Feminist-identified men were substantially more likely to report EDM use than non-feminist men, even after controlling for alcohol use before sex, erection difficulties, sexual arousal, sexual health, mental health, and physical health. One explanation is that feminist men may use EDM to bolster their masculinity when it is otherwise threatened by their identification as feminist. Another is that non-feminist men may be less likely to use prescription EDM because they view accessing healthcare services as a threat to their masculinity. It is also possible that feminist men are more likely to use EDM because they wish to maintain an erection to better please their partner. Lastly, feminist men may be more honest about EDM use than non-feminist men, even though rates are similar. Regardless of the exact reason, therapists can use these results to tailor sexual health messages to clients based on feminist identification. Future work could employ qualitative methods to understand why feminist men report higher rates of EDM use than non-feminist men.

    Reply

  • Snorple

    Snorple

    March 10, 2015, 8:13 pm

    Anti-feminist men typically are insecure about their masculinity, so I don't find it surprising at all that they are less likely to talk to their doctor about their erectile dysfunction and/or more likely to lie about taking medication. Interesting read.

    Reply

  • megatom0

    megatom0

    March 10, 2015, 6:47 am

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  • mredd

    mredd

    March 11, 2015, 1:58 am

    Hospiral policy still requires PPE. It’s not terribly onerous. What is onerous is having to discuss one’s individual exemption with every understandably alarmed and outraged staff member, and even more discussing with families whose eyes light up at the possibility that they can stop having to wear masks because it was a hoax all along.

    Reply

  • corby10

    corby10

    March 11, 2015, 5:50 am

    Moderna’s vaccine now has full FDA approval. This makes no practical difference, and it will not shut up any of the naysayers. But good to know that the FDA is able to approve real medicine as well as aducanumab-style boondoggles.

    STIKO [the German Permanent Committee on Vaccinations, a committee of the RKI, the German CDC equivalent] has announced that it recommends basic immunisation with Comirnaty® 10 µg for children who are between 5 and 11 years old and have pre-existing conditions, in accordance with the approval for this age group. COVID-19 vaccination can also be given to 5- to 11-year-old children without pre-existing conditions at the individual request of children and parents or guardians after medical clearance. In addition, vaccination is recommended for 5- to 11-year-old children who have relatives or other contacts at high risk for a severe course of COVID-19, who cannot be vaccinated themselves, or for whom there is a reasonable suspicion that vaccination will not result in adequate protection (e.g., the elderly and very old, and people on immunosuppressive therapy). 5- to 11-year-old children with pre-existing illness who have had a SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by laboratory diagnosis should receive a vaccine dose approximately 6 months from the SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Reply

  • backpackwayne

    backpackwayne

    March 10, 2015, 10:51 pm

    Public recommendation against vaccination doesn't mean automatically that it's impossible to receive a shot on request. Germany recommends against COVID vaccination in healthy 5-11 year olds too (see other comment) and you just need to explicitly ask and go through an extended consent talk. Although, there is one difference: The German limited recommendation includes children with caretakers who are less likely to be protected by their own vaccination, the Swedish recommendation does not.

    Reply

  • Gravity13

    Gravity13

    March 10, 2015, 6:48 am

    Interesting move considering omicrons higher burden on children. I tried to find something on their health agencies website regarding specifically what risks they are talking about but I can't find anything. I understand that the mRNA vaccines carry a risk of myocarditis (in young men) and the JnJ has an issue with clotting (in adult woman). Seems like you could just recommend a mRNA vaccine for girls and JnJ for boys.

    Reply

  • sonicon

    sonicon

    March 11, 2015, 9:10 am

    Work as an epidemiologist within healthcare system. Our data has been so weird. I monitor a cohort of older frail patients, and there’s been little change in number of admits, and they’re usually not hospitalized for covid. Is omicron hitting younger folks? Maybe because older folks have been boosted? Maybe I just have a bad dataset but it’s really puzzling me that in NYC I haven’t seen any change from delta/fall numbers.

    Also have there been any definitive studies of cohorts of patients that do poorly despite boosting? Looking to find specific cohorts to track. I’ve heard anecdotally transplant and on immunosuppressives could be interesting to look at. It seems like there’s less of the “younger with copd/chf,dm” doing poorly with the vax than we’ve seen in unvaxxed folks

    Reply

  • Chaoticmass

    Chaoticmass

    March 10, 2015, 2:21 pm

    If it were me I'd probably start a baby aspirin for a while on top of other things considering the microthrombi theory for long COVID. Risk seems low. I've been told there is poor data for efficacy anticoag prevention of significant thrombotic outcomes but haven't come across anything trying to look at long COVID for example.

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